World’s First Pastafarian Protest

By DeusExMacintosh

pastafarian

A priest who advised needy people to shoplift has been drenched with spaghetti and ravioli by a protester.

Father Tim Jones, parish priest of St Lawrence and St Hilda in York, said in a sermon that stealing could be the best option for some vulnerable people. He was approached on Sunday by a man who threw a bucket of spaghetti and ravioli at him as he left the church after completing his regular sermon.

A Church of England spokeswoman said: “I can confirm that did happen”.

She said: “After the service on Sunday a chap approached Tim and threw a bucket of spaghetti and ravioli over him. I understand the chap was agitated but Tim had a good chat with him and they parted amicably.

“It was a misunderstanding about what Tim had said.”

The protest was carried out by a York man, who said he had filled the bucket with 30 cans of spaghetti and ravioli. The Church of England spokeswoman said Father Jones was on holiday and unable to comment about the pasta protest.

In the controversial sermon, the clergyman said: “My advice, as a Christian priest, is to shoplift. I do not offer such advice because I think that stealing is a good thing, or because I think it is harmless, for it is neither.

“I would ask that they do not steal from small, family businesses, but from large national businesses, knowing that the costs are ultimately passed on to the rest of us in the form of higher prices.

“I would ask them not to take any more than they need, for any longer than they need.”

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey said Father Jones’s advice had been “misguided and foolish”. The priest’s comments were also criticised by North Yorkshire Police who said justifying shoplifting was “highly irresponsible”.

BBC News

Somebody deserves a flying spaghetti monster lapel pin.

Happy New Year peeps.

10 Comments

  1. Posted January 1, 2010 at 9:33 pm | Permalink

    Yes, HNY to all our readers. Normal service will be resumed just as soon as the hangovers have cleared.

  2. Posted January 3, 2010 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

    Former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey said Father Jones’s advice had been “misguided and foolish”. The priest’s comments were also criticised by North Yorkshire Police who said justifying shoplifting was “highly irresponsible”.

    But the critics of necessity probably think destruction of the commons by the rich, if only by pushing for unnecessary direction of government resources (see middle class welfare, corporate welfare) is all fine and dandy, I suppose.

    Hmmm…. I wonder if the certain wealthy churches, self-identifying as charitable and therefore worthy of tax breaks, are offended by theft from absolute necessity from their own coffers, or a starving person taking money from the collection plate.

  3. Posted January 3, 2010 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

    Ooops, blockquote the wrong way… can someone fix?

  4. DeusExMacintosh
    Posted January 3, 2010 at 9:11 pm | Permalink

    But the critics of necessity probably think destruction of the commons by the rich, if only by pushing for unnecessary direction of government resources (see middle class welfare, corporate welfare) is all fine and dandy, I suppose.

    Co-incidentally, I’m reading “Atlas Shrugged” just at the moment. SL sold it to me as sci-fi which is the only reasonable excuse I can provide. Anvilicious!!

  5. Posted January 3, 2010 at 9:19 pm | Permalink

    DEM was warned in no uncertain terms that Atlas Shrugged dropped more anvils than you can poke a forked stick at, but she still went ahead… I read it at 17 and I noticed the anvils even then…

  6. Patrick
    Posted January 4, 2010 at 7:31 am | Permalink

    So did I, but I liked the look of those anvils even then 😉

  7. AJ
    Posted January 6, 2010 at 12:04 pm | Permalink

    “I wonder if the certain wealthy churches, self-identifying as charitable and therefore worthy of tax breaks, are offended by theft from absolute necessity from their own coffers, or a starving person taking money from the collection plate.”

    Luke 6:1-4 NIV

    (1) One Sabbath Jesus was going through the grainfields, and his disciples began to pick some heads of grain, rub them in their hands and eat the kernels. (2) Some of the Pharisees asked, “Why are you doing what is unlawful on the Sabbath?”

    (3) Jesus answered them, “Have you never read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? (4) He entered the house of God, and taking the consecrated bread, he ate what is lawful only for priests to eat. And he also gave some to his companions.”

  8. Posted January 6, 2010 at 5:13 pm | Permalink

    [email protected]: Good reference…

    Actually I was thinking of a more secular cultural reference the well-heeled are familiar with – Hugo’s “Les Mis”… sympathetic to necessary theft in the first act, but back to normal inviolability of property rights by after-show drinkies.

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