Tag Archives: Adam Smith

Existential threats and other difficulties

Young man, there’s a great deal of ruin in a nation. So Adam Smith responded to a correspondent who feared that a successful revolt by the American colonies would ruin Britain.  Looking back, Adam Smith was right and the fearful young man was wrong. Indeed, Britain proceeded to gain and give up a great empire, and […]

You are correct: westerners care more about Boston than Baghdad – guest post by Jacques Chester

[SL: I have long been of the view–while I have great sympathy for my libertarian and leftist friends who want calamity in the developing world taken as seriously as calamity in the developed world–that the lesson that Jacques teaches below is important, and needs to be taken seriously. There is a reason why ‘if it […]

None so blind

In the course of exploring the history and dynamics of bigotry, of moral exclusion, and the history of money (particularly the similarities between the goldzone Great Depression and the Eurozone Great Recesssion), it has become clear to me how very poor conservatives tend to be at learning from history. Which is not, of course, how conservatives typically see themselves. […]

Stella, by means of a trust

It’s not often that the paths of commercial law and literature intersect, so when it happens, we tend to seize the opportunity with both hands. This post, then, is a discussion of the newly-founded Stella Prize for Australian women writers, and the legal instrument that will of necessity be the vehicle for its ongoing success: […]

Postmodern Conservatism – guest post by Lorenzo

[SL: there was a time, not so long ago, when conservatives and libertarians could afford to be smug about the intellectual miasma in which left-liberals and progressives had lost themselves. It is unfortunate–and does us little credit–that when a decent number of left-liberals reacted in horror to the colonisation of their political tradition by postmodernism […]

The Two Cultures Redux

On May 7, 1959, British physicist and novelist C.P. Snow delivered an influential Rede Lecture at Cambridge University. His lecture concerned the intellectual division between the sciences and the humanities, and contained the following famous passage: I remember G. H. Hardy once remarking to me in mild puzzlement, some time in the 1930s, ‘Have you noticed how the word ‘intellectual’ is used nowadays. There seems to be a new definition which certainly doesn’t include Rutherford or Eddington or Dirac or Adrian or me? It […]

Quality not quantity: sometimes more law doesn’t mean better

Via Jim Belshaw, I have become aware that the Federal government is trying to convince people that it is doing a good job because it has passed more legislation than the previous incumbent government. Jim pointed me to a post by Noric Dilanchian, in which Dilanchian notes that most people think more law is a […]

‘Get off my lawn’

Having put an A in the bank for my Roman law essay, and being so lazy (and weighed down with preparing for Faculty of Advocates exams) that I don’t have another blog post to hand, I thought I’d share the essay with our regulars. As people who’ve been reading my stuff since I used to […]