Tag Archives: Austrian business cycle

Funny summaries

Came across this comment which made me laugh lots: Actually there is a cogent neo-Austrian case for fiscal stimulus, not that any self-described Austrian actually espouses it. As a result of the central bank keeping interest rates artificially low, the private sector, being made up of idiots, indulges in massive malinvestment in useless capital of excessive […]

Bubble trouble: not an easy money problem

The notion that “easy money” created asset booms is levelled (famously by Austrian school economists such as von Mises and Hayek) against the 1920s boom and by a range of commentators about the Great Moderation boom. In both cases, the Fed (dominated by Benjamin Strong as New York Fed Governor up to 1928 and by Alan Greenspan as Fed Chair 1987-2006) is held to be to […]

The misbegotten birth of macro

As folks may have noted, I like graphs; they can be very useful illustrations, particularly of historical trends.  Consider this graph, taken from the 2012 US Federal Budget (via). What is striking is the long-run stability of economic growth in the US, apart from one episode which stands out fairly dramatically. Very dramatically (pdf) given that: […]

Response to Dr Horwitz’s thoughts

Dr Horwitz’s thoughtful and generous response to my original post is useful in clarifying what a serious Austrian school economist thinks and correcting some of my misapprehensions. It seems to have been a useful exercise, to provide reactions to Austrian commentary from someone much more familiar with mainstream economics. Even better, I now have something I […]

Some Thoughts on Lorenzo on Austrian Economics (guest post by Steven Horwitz)

This is a guest post by Steven Horwitz which was originally posted at Critical Thinking Applied but which Dr Horwitz has kindly agreed to be also posted here. Dr. Horwitz is the Charles A. Dana Professor of Economics at St. Lawrence University in Canton, NY. He is the author of two books, Microfoundations and Macroeconomics: An Austrian Perspective (Routledge, 2000) and Monetary […]

About Austrian economics

I find Steve Horwitz, along with George Selgin (prominent advocate of free banking and supporter of a productivity norm [pdf] for monetary policy), the most accessible of contemporary Austrian school economists as they are both clear writers who seek to engage with those who are not of their school and are refreshingly free of the nastiness […]

Put not your faith in labels: naming in the dismal science – guest post by Lorenzo

[SL: A frequent criticism of economics is that the ‘dismal science’ is now too big for its boots: it makes claims in rhetorical language that would do credit to a theologian or philosopher, and often appears to step far outside its remit. This criticism is particularly acute when some large rhetorical claim turns out to […]