Tag Archives: David Hume

Bubble trouble: all information is not equal

This post is partly prompted by this comment and this paper (pdf) (via) on the US housing price bubbles and busts and (greatly) extends this comment by myself. It is also a response to the work of mathematician-turned-historian Andrew Odlyzko. In a previous post, I argued that easy monetary policy was not to blame for the asset booms […]

The Two Cultures Redux

On May 7, 1959, British physicist and novelist C.P. Snow delivered an influential Rede Lecture at Cambridge University. His lecture concerned the intellectual division between the sciences and the humanities, and contained the following famous passage: I remember G. H. Hardy once remarking to me in mild puzzlement, some time in the 1930s, ‘Have you noticed how the word ‘intellectual’ is used nowadays. There seems to be a new definition which certainly doesn’t include Rutherford or Eddington or Dirac or Adrian or me? It […]

‘Throw the Jew down the Well’

You know, sometimes that awful joke in Borat was true. Which means, ahem, that it isn’t funny any more. The remains of 17 bodies found at the bottom of a medieval well in England could have been victims of persecution, new evidence has suggested. The most likely explanation is that those down the well were […]

A mixture problem

Have you ever made a good cocktail by accident? You know, where you combine various ingredients — including quite a few that don’t seem to go together — and yet finish up with something awesome? Yeah, doesn’t happen often, does it? Or it only tastes good when you’re drunk. Taste the mix again later — […]