Tag Archives: FA Hayek

Retrospective legislation against the rule of law

Retrospective legislation and the rule of law F A Hayek neatly summarises the rule of law as follows: Stripped of all technicalities [the rule of law] means the government in all its actions is bound by rules fixed and announced beforehand — rules which make it possible to foresee with fair certainty how the authority […]

‘Get off my lawn’

Having put an A in the bank for my Roman law essay, and being so lazy (and weighed down with preparing for Faculty of Advocates exams) that I don’t have another blog post to hand, I thought I’d share the essay with our regulars. As people who’ve been reading my stuff since I used to […]

The Higher Criticism

Until I was published, I had not experienced that phenomenon known as ‘the literary festival’ or the ‘science fiction convention’ or the ‘[insert favoured genre here] convention’. They are–for one who hasn’t encountered them before–strange beasts, not entirely to be trusted. Like all large, loosely organised events, they are prone to ideological capture, something I […]

Law Evolves

As those of you who’ve participated in my Bring Laws & Gods reading circle know, I’ve had to spend quite a bit of time working out where I thought Roman law would have gone had the Romans had an industrial revolution. Now their law was pretty sophisticated, as law goes. In many ways, it was […]