Tag Archives: ibn Khaldun

A fight over money

Over the last twelve months or so, the blogosphere saw another round of a long-standing fight over money. Not over getting more money (though that is an element too), but its nature and history. A story about debt The aforementioned tussle has been provoked by the publication of David Graeber’s intriguing, but seriously flawed, book Debt: The […]

Debt and boom

The slogan for this post is: don’t think debt, think safe assets. (This post is partly provoked by this post by Paul Krugman responded to by Scott Sumner and by Marcus Nunes.) In my Debt, Doom and Despair post I noted that a hugely debt-burdened post-Napoleonic Wars UK (where the national public debt was probably about […]

Imperialism, it is what rulerships do

I came across (via) this very silly statement: The very idea of empire was created in ancient Rome … That would be news to the Persians, the Chaldeans, the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Hittites, the Egyptians, the House of Ur, the Gutians, the Akkadians, the … And that is just the Middle East. When revenue was […]

Why did the Middle East select for monotheism? – Guest post by Lorenzo

[SL: On September 18, I published a piece on the religious transformation currently going on in Europe, pointing out in passing that monotheism — if one examines its geographic origins — is almost as foreign to Europe as it is to India or China. In the post below, regular commenter Lorenzo has attempted to explain why: […]