Tag Archives: joseph raz

Retrospective legislation against the rule of law

Retrospective legislation and the rule of law F A Hayek neatly summarises the rule of law as follows: Stripped of all technicalities [the rule of law] means the government in all its actions is bound by rules fixed and announced beforehand — rules which make it possible to foresee with fair certainty how the authority […]

Quality not quantity: sometimes more law doesn’t mean better

Via Jim Belshaw, I have become aware that the Federal government is trying to convince people that it is doing a good job because it has passed more legislation than the previous incumbent government. Jim pointed me to a post by Noric Dilanchian, in which Dilanchian notes that most people think more law is a […]

The Higher Criticism

Until I was published, I had not experienced that phenomenon known as ‘the literary festival’ or the ‘science fiction convention’ or the ‘[insert favoured genre here] convention’. They are–for one who hasn’t encountered them before–strange beasts, not entirely to be trusted. Like all large, loosely organised events, they are prone to ideological capture, something I […]

The Noble Experiment

Until I came to do the research for my MPhil, I didn’t realise that Prohibition — that great failed exercise in mass planning — was also known back in the day as ‘the noble experiment’. I learnt of the alternative moniker through Daniel Okrent’s superb history — Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition. […]