Tag Archives: jurisprudence

SL’s Australian visit – 2nd ALS Friedman Conference (and other goodies)

As some of you already know, due to the kind sponsorship of Thought Broker, I shall be travelling to Australia for the 2nd Australian Libertarian Society Friedman Conference (speaker schedule here) and shall also be sharing a platform with new Freedom Commissioner Tim Wilson at one of Thought Broker’s in-house events (details here). Thought Broker […]

Some food for thought: Reist v Wilson

Various people wrote thoughtful responses to my piece on the distinction between principled and means-end limits to law in the context of the ongoing Melinda Tankard Reist v Jennifer Wilson dust-up. I was rather busy last week and so didn’t respond; I figured I ought to respond, so here are some comments and thoughts (still, […]

‘Once we suffered from crimes; now we suffer from laws’

… Tacitus, shortly after the Praetorian Edict, hitherto subject to an annual sunset clause, was enacted in perpetuum, thereby ending most substantive Roman legal innovation and, arguably, Roman societal and scientific innovation as well. Hold that thought. Law has limits I Russell Blackford, toiling alone, has attempted to draw our attention away from the Melinda […]

Crowdsourcing bleg – getting lawyers to think creatively

Law is a conservative profession. There is a reason why a large number of us still dress in clothes associated with the 18th century, and it isn’t because barristers’, advocates’ and judges’ kit flatters anyone, male or female, fat or thin. It’s because, in the law, when it ain’t broke, lawyers are disinclined to fix […]

‘Daring’ to be Different

My year nine English class wrote me a joint letter once. It asked me to kill myself in order to improve everyone else’s educational experience (I was disinclined to acquiesce to their request). It was the culmination of a two-year program of uncontrolled bullying at a supposedly “good” Australian GPS school that included the more […]

Nemo dat v bona fide

Sometimes, both sides of an argument are right. Not just partly right, or right on odd numbered days, or right only under certain circumstances. They’re both right for all time, and — ceteris paribus — under all circumstances.  Some of the thorniest problems in public policy are of this type, and when they come into […]

Ah, but we know what’s good for you!

I’d made some effort to ignore the latest inter-blog political stoush, but when I saw Helen on the Cast Iron Balcony who (unlike many people on all sides of politics in Australia) actually has something between her ears defending Robert Manne (quite possibly the rankest intellectual bully in Australia), I knew something was up. In […]