Tag Archives: LIBOR

Privilege: an advice

[A long time ago, I promised various skeptical friends that I would write a post on the idea of ‘privilege’, something about which I have had grave doubts for some time. Unfortunately life and work got in the way, and the post remained unwritten. However, I then made the same undertaking to various classical liberal […]

‘Bigot of the Year!’

‘We are lawyers, words are our tools’ was one of my pupil-master’s favourite lines, and if anything, lawyering has made me even more careful with how I speak and write than literature and publishing ever did. Yes, I know, the way lawyers parse a statute or a case can seem like mindless pettifogging. There are […]

On simplifying without simplification

[Every now and then, the law throws up something really fascinating. This week’s exercise in fascination was instructions to prepare a briefing note on the causes and consequences of the global financial crisis, directed at yours truly. What made these instructions so difficult to follow is that while the causes and consequences of the GFC […]

Diamond In the Rough

Barclays chief executive Bob Diamond has resigned with immediate effect. The move comes less than a week after the bank was fined for trying to manipulate inter-bank lending rates, sparking a government inquiry and calls for criminal investigations. Mr Diamond said he was stepping down because the external pressure on the bank risked “damaging the […]

Fixed Rates

The Governor of the Bank of England has launched a scathing attack on “deceitful” investment banking and called for a “real change in the culture of the industry” stretching right to the top, in the wake of the Barclays rate-fixing scandal. Sir Mervyn King, who refused to back Barclays chief executive Bob Diamond, added that […]