Tag Archives: Roman law

Check your expectations (2) Women preferring Sharia

I am deeply sceptical about any legal recognition of Sharia on two grounds. First, it is profoundly misogynist, starting with the discounting of evidence from women. Second, it evolved as an imperial legal system. It does not claim to be a legal system for only the faithful, as Jewish law does, but God’s law, applying […]

Divorcing marriage?

When I wrote my Reason Foundation brief on equal marriage, I focussed (understandably) on the empirical arguments both for and against same-sex marriage, leaving rights arguments to one side (what do you expect? I’m a positivist). However, in one section, I addressed (albeit briefly) the common libertarian argument that we should ‘get the state out […]

A mixture problem

Have you ever made a good cocktail by accident? You know, where you combine various ingredients — including quite a few that don’t seem to go together — and yet finish up with something awesome? Yeah, doesn’t happen often, does it? Or it only tastes good when you’re drunk. Taste the mix again later — […]

Vituperatio: When WorkFare Fails

In December the UK coalition government announced that as well as reducing the bill for Disability Living Allowance by 20%, they now intended to abolish the benefit meant to help pay for the additional costs of being disabled and replace it with a harsher ESA-style “Personal Independence Payment”. A foreshortened public consultation over Xmas and […]

Law Evolves

As those of you who’ve participated in my Bring Laws & Gods reading circle know, I’ve had to spend quite a bit of time working out where I thought Roman law would have gone had the Romans had an industrial revolution. Now their law was pretty sophisticated, as law goes. In many ways, it was […]