Tag Archives: Russell Blackford

Defined out – guest post by Lorenzo

[SL: Last night, I went to a debate hosted by the Edinburgh University Debates Union (sic), on the proposition ‘this house supports same-sex marriage’. I was going to say that the Oxford Union it ain’t, but that would be giving them too much credit. Let’s just say that ‘outstandingly crap’ goes some way towards describing it. […]

What Would Joseph Kony Do?

What would Joseph Kony do If he were here right now? He’d burn a blond gay muppet or two, That’s what Joseph Kony’d do. Last week, it emerged that the M25 — for those not in the know, the ‘London Orbital’ and Britain’s biggest carpark — was turning into a tourist attraction, presumably by means of […]

The Religious Education Dilemma, Again

We just got a notice from my daughter’s state school yesterday inviting us to choose which religious education class we’d like to enrol her in. There were a multitude of choices: Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Ba’hai, Buddhist and Hindu (an accurate reflection the nature of her school, I think). Finally, there was the choice to ‘opt […]

Advice, please…

We try to avoid meta around these parts, but the trainwreck on the #equalmarriage thread has prompted some necessary thinking on all our parts, and an admission from me. First, the thinking. This blog — in having four writers with differing politics — is a risky venture. Going by other blogs around the traps, a […]

Review of ‘Freedom of Religion & The Secular State’

On 2 February 2012, I attended the launch of Russell Blackford’s new book, Freedom of Religion and the Secular State. I’ve finished the book so I thought I’d write a brief review as well as some comments on the visible move to secularism in one of my areas of study, trusts law. Blackford’s central thesis […]

Some food for thought: Reist v Wilson

Various people wrote thoughtful responses to my piece on the distinction between principled and means-end limits to law in the context of the ongoing Melinda Tankard Reist v Jennifer Wilson dust-up. I was rather busy last week and so didn’t respond; I figured I ought to respond, so here are some comments and thoughts (still, […]

‘Once we suffered from crimes; now we suffer from laws’

… Tacitus, shortly after the Praetorian Edict, hitherto subject to an annual sunset clause, was enacted in perpetuum, thereby ending most substantive Roman legal innovation and, arguably, Roman societal and scientific innovation as well. Hold that thought. Law has limits I Russell Blackford, toiling alone, has attempted to draw our attention away from the Melinda […]

A Girl Named Sue (with apologies to Johnny Cash)

There’s nothing quite like getting up first thing in the morning to discover service documents sitting in your hallway (or, if you’re in Australia or the US, poking out of your mailbox). This is what has happened to Australian political and skeptical blogger Jennifer Wilson (her blog is ‘No Place for Sheep’) yesterday. I have […]

Patenting stem cell technology legally ‘immoral’ in Europe

The Daily Mail reports that the European Court of Justice has just ruled that it is illegal to patent technological processes and treatment which use of embryonic stem cells because this constitutes ‘commercial exploitation’ which is contrary to morality: Scientists warned the ‘devastating decision’ will stop pioneering treatments for degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and […]

Pontificating on the Bolt case again

This post involves further thoughts on the Eatock v Herald Weekly Times case. I have attempted to clarify a few things, and to illustrate on a practical basis exactly why I think the legislation and the decision could be problematic. Introductory remarks on Bolt, affirmative action and group rights First, I should reiterate that I […]