Tag Archives: Senate

Regulatory Vengeance

[SL: I’ve brought this piece over from Thoughts on Liberty for two reasons: (1) a friend asked me to, and (2), it had its origins in a conversation with other Australian classical liberals in the wake of David Leyonhjelm winning a senate spot in New South Wales. I wrote it because it seems to me, […]

The dynamics of division

A recent post by Stratfor intelligently discusses the dynamics of US presidential elections — why they tend to be so even, why low voter turnout does not seem a good indicator of voter alienation, that big [60%+] wins (Harding 1920, FDR 1936,  LBJ 1964, Nixon 1972) have not generally led to historically well-regarded presidencies. But […]

Retrospective legislation against the rule of law

Retrospective legislation and the rule of law F A Hayek neatly summarises the rule of law as follows: Stripped of all technicalities [the rule of law] means the government in all its actions is bound by rules fixed and announced beforehand — rules which make it possible to foresee with fair certainty how the authority […]

Election Reflection

Well, finally it’s election day. I have to say that even though the campaign only lasted 6 weeks, I was heartily sick of it by the end. As I said in my post on the worm, I think the immediate attention on focus groups, opinion polls and knee-jerk reactions produces bad policy. It’s not policy […]

Things that make me proud

Jim Belshaw wrote a post listing 5 things that make him proud, and has tagged SL and I to do the same. I’m not going to write a list, mainly because I’m terrible at lists. I struggle with memes. The main thing in life that makes me proud is family: my children, my husband, my […]