Tag Archives: Sharia

The misogyny of Sharia on display

The story of the Norwegian Qatar resident Marte Dalelv who brought a charge of rape against a co-worker, was convicted by a Dubai court of perjury, drinking alcohol and extra-marital sex and sentenced to 16 months imprisonment has had a “happy” ending; she has been pardoned by the Emir of Dubai. Dubai is part of […]

Check your expectations (2) Women preferring Sharia

I am deeply sceptical about any legal recognition of Sharia on two grounds. First, it is profoundly misogynist, starting with the discounting of evidence from women. Second, it evolved as an imperial legal system. It does not claim to be a legal system for only the faithful, as Jewish law does, but God’s law, applying […]

The social consequences of theology

The BBC recently noted that interest rates on public debt in the Eurozone varied according to the religious majority of the population — Orthodox Greece had the highest interest rates, followed by the Catholic countries with the Protestant countries having the lowest. Interest rates being a measure of risk, this represented clear market judgements on […]

Can we have an intelligent conversation about Islam?

My recent post about “green on blue” killings in Afghanistan provoked the sort of comments that indicate we have, in the modern West, a real problem having an intelligent conversation about Islam. Not the to-and-fro about the geo-strategic issues regarding Afghanistan, but comments about beliefs within Islam and their possible consequences. The sort of comments […]

Power and purity

Taboos are a major part of religious practice, across a very wide range of religious traditions. Taboos about what people can eat, wear, act, associate with, believe; the entire range of human behaviour.  Religious taboos are nicely defined as: a vehement prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behavior is either too […]

Wills, religion and the state

A paramount tension in cases involving disputes over wills is between testamentary freedom (the idea that people are entitled to stipulate how they want their property distributed once they are dead) and, on the other hand, a desire to prevent unfairness. What happens if a parent leaves property to two of his four children? What […]

The divine law disadvantage – Guest Post by Lorenzo

[LE: Something I often wonder about when studying history is: why do certain civilisations develop in certain ways, and others (which are equally technologically advanced, if not more so) do not develop in the same way? I suppose it’s one of the reasons why I enjoy speculative fiction so much: speculative fiction plays a game […]

Excusitis

Excusitis, n (med): the condition whereby one is rendered incapable of seeing the faults in one’s political position, particularly with respect to that position’s capacity to facilitate the perpetration of violence. When I was a green young lawyer, I was introduced to the ‘No True Scotsman’ logical fallacy. It’s an old concept (the argument is […]