Restitution Blog Posts

By Legal Eagle

Anyone who loves restitution law will have been aware for some time of the Restitution Legal Resource page, maintained by Steve Hedley. It’s a fantastic resource for restitution scholars.

Now Steve has added a page of restitution-related blog posts. How awesome is that? I’m proud to say that a few of them have been penned by yours truly. I can’t wait to see what other posts are out there. I’d love it if a restitution blogging community developed… It would be quite fiery, I imagine: we are an opinionated bunch. Perhaps I need to put something out on the Restitution Discussion Group encouraging others to start blogs?

(Via Cearta.ie, a great blog which also features some private law and restitution related posts)

Update

I have added a category called “restitution” to make restitution law related posts easier to find (should people be minded to read them). There’s also an existing category called “Equity” (just to keep the fusion fallacists happy).

5 Comments

  1. Steve
    Posted August 25, 2008 at 7:53 pm | Permalink

    “Perhaps I need to put something out on the Restitution Discussion Group encouraging others to start blogs?”

    Couldn’t do any harm – A little bit of encouragement from a fellow restitution lawyer might push some into doing it. Actually, I tried syndicating the “recently added” section of the restitution site via RSS a few years ago – but it was all a new thing, and there was total lack of takeup! Maybe the time for Restitution Blogging is here!

  2. Posted August 27, 2008 at 8:28 am | Permalink

    Read my lips…

    N-ERD.

    =)

    Just don’t mention Trident and Mcneice (is that how it’s spelt?)

  3. Posted August 30, 2008 at 12:22 pm | Permalink

    I did the alsa moot yonks ago and in the contracts moot two of the three relevant cases we were picking over were trident and walton stores v maher. Good stuff!

    I’m still a nerd on something like drake… but now with my studies moving into international relations I’m getting tangled more in arguments about constructed objects in security theory. Also major anorak territory…

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