And something lighter for the weekend…

By DeusExMacintosh

Apologies for those who may have noticed the site vanishing act, this was courtesy of an Ozblogistan server somewhere in Texas.

There’s a reason I find this disturbing… I’m just not sure what it is.

17 Comments

  1. kvd
    Posted May 7, 2011 at 6:18 am | Permalink

    DEM, is this the room for the five minute argument, or have I stumbled back into the full half hour?

  2. Posted May 7, 2011 at 8:22 am | Permalink

    Ahh, that brings back memories of the hours and hours I’ve spent arranging the blocks over the years…

  3. Posted May 7, 2011 at 9:29 am | Permalink

    Must … stop… playing … tetris …

    Seriously, the similarities between the scope and structure of Roman law and a well organised game of tetris are so great as to be genuinely disturbing.

    Now back to the real study.

  4. Posted May 7, 2011 at 1:00 pm | Permalink

    SL on tetris – see xkcd’s Heaven.

    Hmmm. Trying to think hard about the equally simple (when the colored balls have symbols on them so I don’t get confused), equally addictive “Frozen Bubble”, and what it would correspond to.

    I’ve sometimes had to create a background shell script to kill any tetris-like games on a regular basis to avoid zombification and get back to real work.

  5. Movius
    Posted May 7, 2011 at 4:56 pm | Permalink

    Just kill off any tetris-likes in the Doom Process Manager

  6. Posted May 7, 2011 at 5:17 pm | Permalink

    Movius, that’s weird. It’s 2 words and a few stars in cron. Problem solved forever.

  7. Movius
    Posted May 7, 2011 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

    But it’s not doom.

    Doom Process Manager was definitely one of the weirder things to come out of the Doom source code release all those years ago.

  8. Posted May 7, 2011 at 7:25 pm | Permalink

    That reminds me of how I used minesweeper to test the touchscreen drivers I was developing. “No really, I’m actually working…”

    If you can combine system management and computer games, surely there’s a way to enable me to write uni assignments by playing games… right?

  9. Movius
    Posted May 8, 2011 at 12:22 am | Permalink

    [email protected]

    Basically you just start writing your essay in Google Scribe then press space repeatedly to choose the first option that shows up. For example, the rest of this post was generated automatically at their request and the response to the first embodiment of the present invention is to provide a method for the determination of the amount of the compound of formula I wherein R is a hydrogen atom or a methyl group at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of California at Berkeley and the University of California at Berkeley and the University of California at Berkeley and the University…

    You may run into a problem with infinite loops though. If this happens just type a few words and phrases that are not in the same way as the first step in the right direction for the future of the country and the world of the living room and dining room with a view to the sea and the mountains of the world and the world of the living room and dining room with a view to the sea and the mountains of the world and the world of the living room and dining room with a view to the sea and the mountains of the world and the world of the living room and dining room with a view to the sea and the mountains of the world.

    Soon your essay will be finished and ready for submission, then you can get on with game playing and the other is a more detailed description of the invention is to provide a method for the determination of the amount of the compound of formula I wherein R is a hydrogen atom or a methyl group at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of California at Berkeley…

  10. Posted May 8, 2011 at 11:23 am | Permalink

    Movius – if I really want to have fun killing processes (with justification), it will be when I’ve caught a user mucking about when they should be working – and later. pull up their screen (I can do it remotely over vnc) and blat their games/inappropriate-web activity at the most annoying time … like when they’ve ALMOST filled in the form for a footy-tipping competition, or they are almost finished playing solitaire. If they /do/ ring me to complain theire PC is playing up I ask what they were doing… “ummm, it’s alright now” or outright lies give me a smile… and they get knocked down my priority list when they /do/ have problems.

    It’s more like whack-a-mole than a first-person-shooter.

    I don’t /stop/ them, because I don’t mind some mucking about at lunchtime.

  11. kvd
    Posted May 8, 2011 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

    Everyone has one, so happy mothers day to them, and to you.

  12. Posted May 8, 2011 at 7:51 pm | Permalink

    [email protected],

    That’s exactly why I dislike “IT” having remote access to my machine, never know what they’re going to do to it. My experience is they tend to break things more often through updates and changes than they fix them. The one size fits all solutions typically offered by IT departments are incredibly frustrating for those capable of doing it themselves. Fortunately I have a linux install at work that I manage myself, meaning I’m mostly immune from IT shenanigans.

  13. Posted May 8, 2011 at 9:38 pm | Permalink

    Addiction: Wolfenstein.

    Excuse: I was a professional tech writer with just closet-loads of suppressed aggression from working in a 98% nerd-boy environment.

  14. Posted May 9, 2011 at 12:21 am | Permalink

    I don’t touch the users machines if I can avoid it. No updates. Just help when called. Have got thoroughly tested virtual machines – when they break their machine I just clone them from the SOE.

    Yes, too many IT depts know what buttons to push … But not why … and more importantly, as you say – why NOT. Unix machines, as you say, look after themselves pretty much as long you’ve got something to clear old temp files and logs regularly. (A couple of server of wiki’s and the like just run and NOBODY has logged into them for nearly 2 years let alone changed anything).

    The only thing that gets changed on their workstations every few days… the users can get back the previous version with one click. Paranoia on my part. Just in case I screw up and get ill before I realize it. But then, I’ve been programming since 1974, have written and sysadmind systems where if I got it wrong, people got the wrong medical treatment. Paranoia is a virtue.

  15. Patrick
    Posted May 9, 2011 at 6:27 am | Permalink

    I would want an IT person fired if they did that, [email protected], and they probably would be. Hopefully you are talking about a very different kind of work environment (although I actually never play games online).

    But our IT people have to request, and be granted, access unless they get clearance for some kind of urgent or emergency situation, so thankfully unlikely to happen.

  16. Posted May 9, 2011 at 9:32 am | Permalink

    Patrick,

    I blat what is expressly prohibited by company policy. A kill of prohibited (except at lunchtime) processes is the gentlest reminder of policy possible, much gentler than a “3 strikes” policy, especially as I drop not-so-subtle hints about the general issue next time I’m with the person.

    Like “How are you Dave?” “Grrr. Trying to cope with people who are stupid enough to send/receive offensive images through the corporate email – even when they know everything is archived forever for legal document discovery later and nobody, not even me, can clean up.”

    I’ve got carte blanche with everything but the accounting systems – because, as the boss says, that’s the only job where the people doing the work do it better than I could.

  17. Posted May 9, 2011 at 10:16 am | Permalink

    Is it really the role of IT to enforce company policy* though? I could understand if the behaviour was a threat to the IT infrastructure (such as excessive bandwidth use), but surely things that are simply related to productivity are the domain of that employees supervisor/manager.

    *’Company policy’ is something that has the fantastic ability to turn an otherwise enjoyable and satisfying job into a soul sucking exercise in futility.

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